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Dollar General Workers' Compensation: How to File a Claim

Written by
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Victoria Muñoz
Lead Attorney
October 16, 2023  ·  5 min read
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Retail may seem like a fairly safe job, but accidents happen all the time. According to a 2020 study from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the rate of nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses in the retail sector is 3.6 cases per 100 workers. With over 19,000 stores across the United States — more than any other retailer in the country — it’s no surprise that workplace injuries happen at Dollar General. 

If you were injured while working at Dollar General, regardless of how the injury happened or whose fault it was, you are likely entitled to benefits. Here’s how to ensure you get your Dollar General workers’ compensation.


How does Dollar General workers’ comp work?

Workers’ compensation at Dollar General follows the same basic steps as worker’s comp at other companies:

You report your injury.

If you are injured while working at Dollar General, the first thing you must do — after seeking medical care, of course — is alert your supervisor, preferably in writing. Your supervisor may have you fill out an accident report form. In addition to telling your manager, you should report your work-related injury to Dollar General’s 24-hour Risk Management Hotline at 800-456-9446. It is important to report the injury immediately to get the claims process started. For repetitive motion injuries, like carpal tunnel syndrome, it may take longer to discover the condition and its relationship to your work at Dollar General. In those cases, report the injury as soon as possible.

Dollar General opens a claim.

After you report the injury, Dollar General will open a claim with its insurer. All states — except for Texas — require businesses to have workers’ compensation insurance. A case manager or claims adjuster from Dollar General’s insurance company will reach out to you to get more details about your case and let you know about potential benefits. 

Your claim gets approved or denied.

The case manager or claims adjuster will investigate Dollar General’s claim. Once approved, Dollar General’s insurer will cover your medical care and provide reimbursement for any time you couldn’t work due to your workplace injury. If your worker’s comp claim is denied, you can file an appeal.

A workers’ comp lawyer can help you navigate the claims and appeals process in your area. A lawyer can advocate for you and maximize your benefits while you recover.

Call us to get help with your workers' comp claim today.

4 common workplace injuries as a Dollar General employee

Two broad categories of injuries qualify for worker’s comp: workplace injuries that happen on-site and medical conditions with a causal relationship to the work environment. 

Dollar General has come under fire from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which added the discount store chain to its Severe Violator Enforcement Program in October 2022 because of hazardous working conditions. For Dollar General employees, here are some of the accidents that can happen on the job:

1. Overexertion and bodily reaction

Overexertion and bodily reactions are the most common workplace injuries, accounting for 21.7% of incidents. 

Whether you work in a Dollar General distribution center or retail storefront, you might find yourself routinely lifting heavy objects or engaging in repetitive motions that can lead to cumulative injuries, especially in your back — the most frequently injured body part in these cases. 

2. Falls, slips, and trips

Falls, slips, and trips are relatively common at work, accounting for 18% of all workplace injuries. These cases usually result in sprains, strains, and tears, making it difficult to return to work at full capacity.

Whether you slip in an aisle that was just mopped or trip on a pothole while retrieving Dollar General shopping carts, always report the injury as soon as possible.

3. Contact with objects and equipment

Unfortunately, working in retail puts you at increased risk of falling merchandise. Injuries involving contact with objects and equipment account for 16.7% of all work-related injuries.

Contact with objects and equipment injuries are common for Dollar General workers. OSHA inspectors found improperly stacked shelves and high stacks of merchandise in aisles when visiting Dollar General stores in Alabama in 2022.

4. Violence

Thankfully, violence is one of the rarest forms of workplace injury, accounting for just 3.3% of cases in 2020. However, cases do come up, and if you work in a retail setting, you may be more vulnerable to violence than someone who works a desk job. 

Dollar General has faced criticism from workers, who allege that the sparsely staffed stores, which sometimes only have one employee behind the checkout, are easy targets for crime and violence. According to data from the Gun Violence Archive, there have been more than 300 incidents of gun violence at Dollar General locations since 2014.


How much is a Dollar General claim worth?

You won't know exactly how much your Dollar General claim is worth until it is approved. Workers’ comp benefits cover both accident-related medical expenses and lost wages for workers temporarily or permanently out of work.

How much you’ll get for medical expenses depends on the type of injury, but in most states, the base workers’ comp payments for lost wages on two-thirds of your average weekly wage (AWW) before taxes. Some states have minimum and maximum benefit amounts based on the average weekly wages of workers in their state. Check out this guide to payment percentages in every state.


4 common questions about Dollar General workers’ comp

If you are a Dollar General employee and get injured on the job, here are answers to some common questions about the company's workers' compensation process.

How long do you have to file a workers’ compensation claim at Dollar General?

If you are injured while working at Dollar General, you should notify your manager and call the Dollar General Risk Management Hotline (800-456-9446) as soon as possible. Every state has different deadlines for filing a workers' comp claim. Some states, like Nevada, require you to report your injury within 90 days of the incident, while others, like Colorado, are more lenient (2 years).

Do you need a lawyer for a Dollar General workers’ compensation case?

No, you do not need a lawyer to apply for Dollar General workers’ comp. However, working with a lawyer can streamline the application process and increase your benefit amount by five times.

If you were injured working at Dollar General, take this 3-minute quiz to determine if you qualify for worker’s comp. If you are eligible, we’ll connect you with a representative to review your case. There are no upfront costs.

Can Dollar General fire me for filing a workers’ compensation claim?

Firing a worker in retaliation is illegal for filing a workers’ comp claim in all states. It is also unlawful for an employer to discourage someone from filing workers’ comp. If you were fired from Dollar General after filing a workers’ compensation claim, a lawyer may be able to help.

What is the phone number for reporting a Dollar General work-related injury?

You can report a work-related injury to Dollar General’s 24-hour Risk Management Hotline at 800-456-9446. In addition to calling the hotline, you should notify your supervisor of the injury in writing. Reporting your injury quickly can help your workers’ comp case.


Get help with your workers’ compensation claim

Atticus has a wide network of vetted workers’ compensation attorneys. Fill out this quick workers’ comp quiz, and someone from our team will be in touch to learn more about your claim. If you’re eligible, we can connect you with a local workers’ comp lawyer to support your case — with no upfront costs.


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Related resources:

What Is Workers' Comp & How Does It Work?

A hand draw portrait of a smiling, helpful lawyer.
By Victoria Muñoz

What Should You Do if You're Injured at Work?

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By Victoria Muñoz

See what you qualify for

How long ago did you get an injury or illness at work?

A drawing of the lead workers' compensation lawyer for Atticus.

Victoria Muñoz

Lead Attorney

Victoria Muñoz is an attorney on Atticus’s Workers' Compensation team. She’s a licensed attorney, a graduate of Stanford Law School, and has counseled hundreds of people seeking workers' compensation. In her free time, she enjoys hiking and spending time with her pup.
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