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How Much Can I Make on SSDI or SSI in 2024?

Written by
Jackie Jakab, Disability Attorney
Jackie Jakab
Lead Attorney
June 23, 2022  ·  5 min read
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If you’re looking for disability benefits, your best option is to apply for Social Security disability. But there are two federal programs to consider. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is an option if you’ve worked and paid taxes for years. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is available to people who don’t have much work history, children with disabilities, and people over age 65.

Both programs come with strict eligibility requirements and a long application process, but the monthly disability checks and free health insurance are worth the effort.

SSDI offers higher earning potential — the maximum possible SSDI check is $3,822 per month versus $943 with SSI. But which program you apply for depends on your situation. Some people also qualify for both.


How much does SSDI pay in 2024?

In 2024, the maximum monthly amount you can get from SSDI is $3,822. But most people aren’t getting nearly that much. The average SSDI benefit is only about $1,489.26 per month.

Calculating your SSDI benefits

Qualifying for SSDI doesn’t mean the Social Security Administration (SSA) will cut you a check for a set amount. Instead, how much you get is based on your historical earnings and how much you’ve paid into Social Security through the years.

You can calculate your SSDI benefit amount on your own, but the easiest way to see how much you’d get is to create a free mySocialSecurity account. (If you’re thinking about applying, you’ll need to make an account anyway.) Once you do, you’ll see exactly how much the SSA expects you to receive through SSDI.

SSDI vs. retirement benefits

Your monthly SSDI payment is exactly the same as your full Social Security retirement benefit. But keep in mind that you won’t get your full retirement benefit until you reach your full retirement age — between 66 and 67 years old, depending on when you were born.

So SSDI offers you more money each month (plus the same health insurance) compared to taking early retirement benefits (ERBs).

If you’re really unsure whether it’s better to apply for disability or just take ERBs, here’s our deep dive into retiring early vs. applying for SSDI.

Average SSDI payments by state

The size of your SSDI check depends on your income and tax history, but average benefits do vary by state. Here’s a state-by-state breakdown of the average SSDI amount to give you an idea of how much people get in your area.

State

Average monthly SSDI benefit

Alabama

1,454.98

Alaska

1,473.09

Arizona

1,542.92

Arkansas

1,415.43

California

1,524.99

Colorado

1,497.71

Connecticut

1,549.41

Delaware

1,599.97

District of Columbia

1,321.04

Florida

1,521.74

Georgia

1,485.38

Hawaii

1,532.11

Idaho

1,456.79

Illinois

1,495.07

Indiana

1,480.12

Iowa

1,412.23

Kansas

1,439.17

Kentucky

1,446.53

Louisiana

1,421.25

Maine

1,395.33

Maryland

1,542.21

Massachusetts

1,493.30

Michigan

1,508.94

Minnesota

1,475.73

Mississippi

1,416.49

Missouri

1,441.07

Montana

1,407.08

Nebraska

1,391.82

Nevada

1,562.44

New Hampshire

1,528.42

New Jersey

1,648.06

New Mexico

1,398.19

New York

1,540.57

North Carolina

1,483.98

North Dakota

1,388.96

Ohio

1,422.89

Oklahoma

1,423.04

Oregon

1,459.64

Pennsylvania

1,493.44

Rhode Island

1,464.35

South Carolina

1,512.46

South Dakota

1,391.16

Tennessee

1,446.63

Texas

1,463.70

Unknown

1,436.77

Utah

1,473.63

Vermont

1,398.34

Virginia

1,497.40

Washington

1,494.32

West Virginia

1,465.15

Wisconsin

1,460.01

Wyoming

1,485.89


How much does SSI pay in 2024?

In 2024, SSI benefits max out at $943 per month. That said, just like SSDI, most people aren’t getting that full amount. In November 2023, the average recipient got an SSI payment of $674 each month.

How SSI benefits checks get calculated

With SSI, any money you’re bringing in directly reduces the size of your benefit check. That includes income from a job but also passive income sources like state disability programs, VA benefits, and SSDI. Even if you don’t have your own income, living with someone else who pays for all of your housing or food (like if you live with a sibling for free) could also lower the value of your monthlySSI check.

To get a better idea of how much you’ll receive from SSI, here’s our breakdown of how SSI is calculated.

Average SSI payments by state

Where you live doesn’t directly affect the value of your SSI payments — only your income does — but average benefits do vary by state. The table below will help you figure out the average SSI payment in your state.

State

Average monthly SSI benefit

Alabama

591.69

Alaska

575.77

Arizona

605.67

Arkansas

605.75

California

578.62

Colorado

594.1

Connecticut

608.91

Delaware

621.89

District of Columbia

637.52

Florida

598.21

Georgia

597.73

Hawaii

580.59

Idaho

598.36

Illinois

619.56

Indiana

615.55

Iowa

591.64

Kansas

602.02

Kentucky

603.5

Louisiana

611.54

Maine

585.11

Maryland

629.1

Massachusetts

604.27

Michigan

624.9

Minnesota

626.6

Mississippi

586.1

Missouri

593.27

Montana

569.33

Nebraska

586.18

Nevada

612.35

New Hampshire

577.42

New Jersey

575.6

New Mexico

580.32

New York

608.38

North Carolina

589.16

North Dakota

562.1

Ohio

625.24

Oklahoma

605.51

Oregon

610.13

Pennsylvania

631.22

Rhode Island

605.11

South Carolina

588.41

South Dakota

577.78

Tennessee

599.07

Texas

583.16

Utah

599.43

Vermont

583.56

Virginia

602.22

Washington

624.52

West Virginia

610.45

Wisconsin

613.05

Wyoming

582.19

Wyoming

1,485.89


Can you get SSDI and SSI at the same time?

Yes, you can qualify for SSDI and SSI together, though generally your SSDI benefit will be worth too much for you to also qualify for SSI. Many people who qualify for SSDI also won’t qualify for SSI because either their income or assets will be too high.

There are a couple of situations where it’s worth applying for both, like if you need health insurance quickly. SSI extends Medicaid coverage as soon as your application is accepted. With SSDI, you’ll need to get through a 24-month waiting period before you get covered by Medicare.

Learn more about who should apply for both SSDI and SSI.


How much do SSDI and SSI pay together in 2024?

Combining SSDI and SSI won’t necessarily result in a fat check. The max amount you can receive when part of both programs at the same time is $943 in 2024.

Because the maximum possible SSI benefit is $943, that’s also the most you can get from both programs at the same time. To oversimplify a bit, every dollar you get from SSDI means a dollar less you can get from SSI. Let’s say you’re getting $800 from SSDI. That $800 is subtracted from the $943 max SSI amount, so your SSI check would be just $143. If you have any other income sources, your SSI benefit will drop more.


How to apply for disability benefits and win

No matter which disability program you qualify for, the monthly checks and free health insurance are a big help. But getting benefits is complicated. The application is long and you’ll probably have to go through multiple rounds of denials and appeals.

To help you get through the application confidently, we’ve created this step-by-step-guide based on the advice of our lawyers.

If you’ve already been denied once or even multiple times, your best option is to work with a disability lawyer. A lawyer can help even before you apply, but if you’ve already gotten a denial, professional help triples your likelihood of approval.

To get personalized assistance with your application and get matched with a lawyer today, take this quick disability benefits quiz. If you do want to talk with a lawyer, you won’t ever have to pay anything unless they win you benefits.

Ready to get benefits today?

Frequently asked questions about disability payments

Which pays more, SSDI or SSI?

SSDI pays more than SSI. The maximum possible SSDI payment is $3,822 per month, while SSI pays up to $943 per month in 2024. Exactly how much you get depends on your individual situation. Some people do qualify for SSDI and SSI at the same time.

Does my disability affect how much I get from SSDI or SSI?

No, your medical condition doesn't impact the amount you receive from Social Security disability benefits. Your SSDI benefit is based on your income and tax history, while your SSI income is based on your other monthly income. Read more about which conditions qualify you for disability.

What state has the highest SSDI payment?

The state with the average SSDI payment is New Jersey at $1,648 per month, per the SSA's most recent statistical report.

What state has the highest SSI payment?

As of the start of 2023, SSI recipients in the District of Columbia (Washington, D.C.) had the average SSI payment at $606 per month.

Can I still work if I get SSDI?

You can work on SSDI, but if you earn close to $1,550 per month in 2024 (the substantial gainful activity limit), it could mean losing benefits. For more help, start with our guide to working on SSDI.

What counts as income for SSI?

SSI counts most income sources when finding your benefit amount. That includes work income but also other disability benefits you receive, and assistance you get from someone else for paying rent or utility bills. You can find dozens of common examples in our explanation of what counts as SSI income.


Find disability help in your state

Alabama

Arizona

California

Colorado

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Virginia

Washington

Wisconsin

Other regions


Related resources:

Everything You Should Know About Disability Benefits (SSDI and SSI)

By Sarah Aitchison

An Easy-to-Follow Guide to Applying for Disability Benefits

A hand drawn image of the lead disability lawyer.
By Jackie Jakab

See what you qualify for

How long has your condition made it hard to work?

Jackie Jakab, Disability Attorney

Jackie Jakab

Lead Attorney

Jackie Jakab is Atticus’s Legal Director. She’s a licensed attorney, a graduate of the University of Chicago Law School, and has counseled thousands of people seeking disability benefits.
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